*The dates and times of specific sessions may continue to be updated.

SCHEDULE: SHAKESPEARE AND DIGITAL STORYTELLING 
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Institute for Teachers

Official Institute Dates: July 11-22, 2022

WEEK ONE: JULY 10 – JULY 15, 2022                                                                                                                                                   

The first week of the institute focuses primarily on reading and discussion of three of Shakespeare’s plays that are influenced by folk and fairy tales and on introducing tools, techniques, and selected technologies used in the digital humanities, with an emphasis on digital storytelling. The readings, discussions, and activities engaged in during Week One offer the background information and requisite technical skills that will allow fellows to undertake a micro-research project that includes a digital storytelling (DST) component. The research examines a theme from one play that draws on the folk and fairy tale influences on the story; the participants may choose to examine the theme from the perspective of literary analysis, historical analysis, or performance possibilities. 

*Note: Seminars typically refer to sessions during which the focus is on interpretation and theory. 

Workshops refer to sessions that focus on techniques and pedagogy.

SUNDAY, JULY 10              

5:00–6:00PM                          
Registration and Check-in for Residence Hall
Rebekah Hall

6:00–7:30PM                          
Get-acquainted Meeting
Rebekah Hall

MONDAY, JULY 11

9:00–9:45AM                         
Welcome and Introduction to the Institute 
Campbell 115

9:45-10:00AM
Break

10:00–11:30AM                     
Seminar: Shakespeare and the Folktale (Part I) 
Charlotte Artese, Facilitator
Campbell 115

Readings:  
The Taming of the Shrew (Folger Shakespeare edition)  

Introduction and Chapter 1, Shakespeare and the Folktale: An Anthology of Stories, Charlotte Artese, Editor (Princeton UP, 2019) 

11:30AM–1:30PM                
Lunch (on your own)

1:30–2:15PM                        
Seminar: Introduction to the Digital Humanities and Digital Storytelling (DST)
Toby Emert, Facilitator
Mac Lab, McCain Library (G-11) (ground floor)

Readings: Robin, Bernard R. (2008). “Digital Storytelling: A Powerful Technology Tool for the 21stCentury Classroom.” Theory into Practice47(3), 220–28.                   

2:15–3:15PM                            
Workshop: Introduction to the Tools and Techniques of DST  
Toby Emert, Facilitator (with assistance from the staff of the Center for Digital and Visual Literacy) 
Mac Lab, McCain Library (G-11) (ground floor)

3:15-3:30PM
Break

3:30–4:15PM                          
Small Group Meetings
Shelby Coffin, Ashley DeGracia, Jerry Rigdon, and Nikki Steverson, Facilitators

Shelby’s Group: Trianna, Asia, Colleen, Laura, Megan, Nicole, Ryan
Ashley’s Group: Asha, Bethany, Courtney, Helen, Mike, Sarah
Jerry’s Group: Angela, Emma, Kelly M., Marnie, Lisa, Nikkia
Nikki’s Group: Allie, Ashley, David, Kelly W., Marissa, Stephanie

TUESDAY, JULY 12

9:30-10:00AM                            
Warm-up for the Day
Campbell 115

10:00-11:30AM                        
Seminar: Shakespeare and the Folktale (Part II)  
Charlotte Artese, Facilitator 
Campbell 115

Readings:  
The Taming of the Shrew (Folger Shakespeare edition)  
Additional readings may be required (documents will be provided via the institute wiki).

11:30AM–1:30PM                    
Lunch (on your own) 

1:30PM-2:15PM                       
Seminar: Introduction to Visual Rhetoric and Design 
Nell Ruby, Facilitator
Virtual Session
Mac Lab, McCain Library (G-11) (ground floor)

2:15PM-3:00PM                       
Workshop: Digital Storytelling: Theory and Practice 
Toby Emert, FacilitatorMac Lab, McCain Library (G-11) (ground floor)

3:00-3:15PM                            
Break

3:15-4:00PM                            
Small Group Meetings 

Shelby Coffin, Ashley DeGracia, Jerry Rigdon, and Nikki Steverson, Facilitators 

5:00PM                                    
Working Dinner to include discussion of ideas for DST project and classroom implementation (optional) 
Raging Burrito, Decatur Square
Shelby Coffin, Rachel Darr, Ashley DeGracia, Jerry Rigdon, and Nikki Steverson, Facilitators

WEDNESDAY, JULY 13

9:30-10:00AM                            
Warm-up for the Day
Campbell 115

10:00-11:30AM                        
Seminar: Shakespeare and the Folktale (Part III)
Charlotte Artese, Facilitator   
Campbell 115

Readings:  
A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Folger Shakespeare edition) 

Additional readings (available through the institute wiki): 

Libyan folktale, “The Iron Pestle and the Girl with the Donkey’s Head”
Bushnaq, Inea. Arab Folktales. Pantheon, 1986. 158-65.

Selected stories from A Dictionary of British Folk-tales, vol. B1 
Briggs, Katharine M. A Dictionary of British Folk-tales. 4 vols. Indiana UP, 1971.

“A Brownie Legend from Lincolnshire,” pgs. 191-92

“The Brownie and the Milk-Bowl,” pg. 193

“The Earth-Bound Trow” pg. 211

“The Enchanted Fisherman,” pg. 213

“The Fairy Dwelling on Selena Moor,” pgs. 225-27

“The King of the Fairies,” pg. 296

“The Little Man’s Gift,” pg. 303

“Mary Nelson,” pgs. 311-1

“Pixy-Led,” pg. 341

11:30-1:00PM                          
Lunch (on your own) 

1:00-2:30PM                            
Workshop: Introduction to Visual Thinking for the Theatre 
Adam King, Atlanta Shakespeare Tavern, Facilitator
Winter Theatre, Dana Fine Arts Building

2:30-2:45PM                            
Break

2:45-3:30PM                            
Small Group Meetings 

Shelby Coffin, Ashley DeGracia, Jerry Rigdon, and Nikki Steverson, Facilitators 

THURSDAY, JULY 14

9:30-10:00AM                            
Warm-up for the Day
Campbell 115

10:00-11:30AM                        
Seminar: Shakespeare and the Folktale (Part IV)
Charlotte Artese, Facilitator   
Campbell 115

Readings:  

Hamlet (Folger Shakespeare edition), Acts 1-2 

From Saxo Grammaticus, Danish History (12th century CE)

Hansen, William F. Saxo Grammaticus and the Life of Hamlet: A Translation, History, and Commentary. U of Nebraska P, 1983. 95-110.

**This viking legend is the ultimate source behind Shakespeare’s play. The names, however, differ:

Orvendil > King Hamlet

Fengi > Claudius

Geruth > Gertrude

Amleth > Hamlet

Please read sections 1-8. 

Icelandic folktale, “The Story of Brjám”

Gollancz, Israel. Hamlet in Iceland. David Nutt, 1898.

Description of ATU 751A, “The Farmwife is Changed into a Woodpecker”

Uther, Hans-Jörg. The Types of International Folktale: A Classification and Bibliography. 3 vols. Folklore Fellows, 2004.

German folktale, “The Black Woodpecker”

Ranke, Kurt, ed. Folktales of Germany. Trans. Lotte Baumann. U of Chicago P, 1966. 150, 223.

Norwegian folktale, “The Gjertrud Bird”

Asbjørnsen, Peter Christian and Jørgen Moe. The Complete and Original Norwegian Folktales of Asbjørnsen and Moe. Trans. Tiina Nunnally. U of Minnesota P, 2019. 7-8.

11:30-1:00PM                          
Lunch (on your own) 

1:00-2:00PM                            
Seminar: Historical Approaches in Digital Humanities Research (Part I)  
Robin Morris, Facilitator 
Campbell 115

Readings:

Holmes, R.E. (2019). “Teaching Serial with Shakespeare: Using Rhetoric to Resist.” In Teaching Social Justice through Shakespeare: Why Renaissance Literature Matters Now. Edited by Hillary Eklund and Wendy Beth Hyman. Edinburgh UP.

Boster, T. (2019). “From Pansophia to Public Humanities: Connecting Past and Present through Community-Based Learning.” In Teaching Social Justice through Shakespeare: Why Renaissance Literature Matters Now. Edited by Hillary Eklund and Wendy Beth Hyman. Edinburgh UP.

2:00-3:00PM                            
Small Group Consultations with Institute Faculty
Campbell 115

3:00-3:30PM                           
 Small Group Meetings 

Shelby Coffin, Ashley DeGracia, Jerry Rigdon, and Nikki Steverson, Facilitators 

FRIDAY, JULY 15

9:30-10:00AM                            
Warm-up for the Day
Campbell 115

10:00-11:30AM                        
Seminar: Shakespeare and the Folktale (Part V)
Charlotte Artese, Facilitator   
Campbell 115

Readings:  

Hamlet (Folger Shakespeare edition), Acts 3-5 

Sigmund Freud, Letter to Wilhelm Fliess, Oct. 15, 1897 

Freud, Sigmund. The Origins of Psychoanalysis: Letters, Drafts and Notes to Wilhelm Fliess, 1887-1902. Doubleday, 1954. 226-27.

Descriptions of ATU 931, “Oedipus” and ATU 930, “The Prophecy”

Uther, Hans-Jörg. The Types of International Folktale: A Classification and Bibliography. 3 vols. Folklore Fellows, 2004.

Folktales from Lowell Edmunds, Oedipus: The Ancient Legend and Its Later Analogues. Johns Hopkins UP, 1985.

“Jean” (Egyptian Christian), 73-79

“The Rabbi and His Son” (Israeli), 199-205

German folktale, “The Devil with the Three Golden Hairs”

Grimm, Jacob and Wilhelm. The Complete Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm. Trans. and ed. Jack Zipes. Bantam, 1987. 109-16.

11:30AM-1:00PM                     
Lunch (on your own)

1:00-1:45PM                            
Workshop: Productivity Tools for DST 
Toby Emert, Facilitator 
Mac Lab, McCain Library (G-11) (ground floor)

1:45-2:15PM                            
Reflection on Week One

2:15-4:00PM                            
Research/Project Planning/Lab Time (on your own)

5:00PM                                    
Field Trip to Atlanta Shakespeare Tavern (dinner included)
Production: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

WEEK TWO: JULY 18-22, 2022

The second week of the institute focuses primarily on research and the development of a digital storytelling project based on the interactions with Shakespeare’s plays from Week 1 of the institute and on considerations for classroom implementation of ideas from the institute. The readings, discussions, and activities will offer opportunities to experiment with the elements of DST, imagine the possibilities for DST with the students they teach, and produce a micro-research project that includes a DST component. The participants’ research will examine a theme from one play that draws on the folk and fairy tale influences on the story; the participants will approach the theme from the perspective of literary analysis, historical analysis, or performance possibilities. 

MONDAY, JULY 18

9:00-9:30AM                                          
Introduction to Week Two of the Institute
Campbell 115

9:30-10:30AM                          
Seminar: A Sampling of Shakespeare-focused Digital Humanities Projects
Kayla Shipp, Digital Humanities Program Manager, Yale University, Facilitator
Campbell 115

10:30-10:45AM                        
Break

10:45AM-11:30AM                   
Workshop: Script Development for Digital Storytelling
Toby Emert, Facilitator
Campbell 115

11:30AM-1:00PM                         
 Lunch (on your own)

1:00-2:30PM                            
Research/Project Planning/Lab Time

2:30-3:30PM                                           
Small Group Meetings 

Shelby Coffin, Ashley DeGracia, Jerry Rigdon, and Nikki Steverson, Facilitators 

TUESDAY, JULY 19

9:00-9:30AM                            
Warm-up for the Day
Campbell 115

9:30-10:30AM                          
Seminar: Historical Approaches in Digital Humanities Research (Part II)
Robin Morris, Facilitator
Campbell 115

10:30-10:45AM                        
Break

10:45AM-Noon                         
Panel Discussion: Classroom Considerations for a Digital Shakespeare Project        Campbell 115

Noon-1:30PM                                         
Lunch (on your own)

1:30-2:00PM                                           
Voiceover Narration and Recording
Joshua Cahn, Facilitator
Campbell 115

2:00–3:00PM                              
Lab Time/Project Development/Research 

3:00-3:30PM                            
Small Group Meetings 

Shelby Coffin, Ashley DeGracia, Jerry Rigdon, and Nikki Steverson, Facilitators 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 20

9:00-9:30AM                            
Warm-up for the Day
Campbell 115

9:30-11:30AM                          
Small Group Story Circle Discussion
Campbell 115 or Dana 101

11:30AM-1:00PM                     
Lunch (on your own)

1:00-3:00PM                                           
Lab Time/Project Development/Research 

3:00-3:30PM                            
Small Group Meetings 

Shelby Coffin, Ashley DeGracia, Jerry Rigdon, and Nikki Steverson, Facilitators 

THURSDAY, JULY 21

9:00-9:30AM                            
Warm-up for the Day
Campbell 115

9:30-11:30AM                          
Digital Storytelling Preview Event
Campbell 115 or Dana 101

11:30AM-Noon                                     
Small Group Meetings 

Shelby Coffin, Ashley DeGracia, Jerry Rigdon, and Nikki Steverson, Facilitators

Noon -1:30PM                                       
Lunch (on your own)

1:30-3:30PM                                           
Lab Time/Revision Work 

FRIDAY, JULY 22

9:30AM-Noon                                        
Digital Storytelling Premiere
“The Frannie” Auditorium, Campbell Hall

Noon-12:45PM                                     
Final Notes and Reflections

12:45PM                                                    
Farewell Luncheon
Rebekah Hall